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Georgie Parker
34,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Georgina "Georgie" Parker (born 16 December 1964 in Sydney) is an Australian television actress. She grew up in the suburb of St. Ives. Parker attended St Ives North Public School in primary and attended the all-girls' Abbotsleigh School for Girls, in Sydney. She has been married since December 1999 to Steve Worland, the screenwriter of the Fox Searchlight feature film Bootmen (2000). They have a daughter, Holly, born in September 2000. Parker was first seen on Yahoo Serious' Young Einstein, before becoming known on Australian TV through her role as nurse Lucy Gardiner in A Country Practice from 1989 to 1992. She also appeared as Despina, Memo's love interest, in the 90's sitcom, Acropolis Now and young firefighter "Mad Dog" Cartwright in the first season of Fire (TV series).

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 18.01.2021
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Hollywood vs. The Author
27,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

It’s no secret that authors have a love-hate relationship with Hollywood. The oft-repeated cliché that “the book was better than the movie” holds true for more reasons than the average reader will ever know. When asked about selling their book rights to Hollywood authors like to joke that they drive their manuscripts to the border of Arizona and California and toss them over the fence, driving back the way they came at breakneck speed. This is probably because Hollywood just doesn’t “get it.” Its vision for the film or TV series rarely seems to match the vision of the author. And for those rare individuals who’ve had the fortune of sitting across the desk from one of the myriad, interchangeable development execs praising the brilliance of their work while ticking off a never-ending list of notes for the rewrite, the pros of pitching their work to Hollywood rarely outweigh the cons. Stephen Jay Schwartz has sat on both sides of that desk—first as the Director of Development for film director Wolfgang Petersen, then as a screenwriter and author pitching his work to the film and television industry. He’s seen all sides of what is known in this small community as “Development Hell.” The process is both amusing and heartbreaking. Most authors whose work contains a modicum of commercial potential eventually find themselves in “the room” taking a shot at seeing their creations re-visualized by agents, producers or development executives. What they often discover is that their audience is younger and less worldly as themselves. What passes for “story notes” is often a mishmash of vaguely connected ideas intended to put the producer’s personal stamp on the project. Hollywood Versus The Author is a collection of non-fiction anecdotes by authors who’ve had the pleasure of experiencing the development room firsthand—some who have successfully managed to straddle the two worlds, seeing their works morph into the kinds of feature films and TV shows that make them proud, and others who stepped blindsided into that room after selling their first or second novels. All the stories in this collection illustrate the great divide between the world of literature and the big or small screen. They underscore the insanity of every crazy thing you’ve ever heard about Hollywood. For insiders and outsiders alike, Hollywood Versus The Author delivers the goods. With contributions by Michael Connelly, Lawrence Block, Max Allan Collins, Alan Jacobson, Andrew Kaplan, Tess Gerritsen, James Brown, Peter James, Rob Roberge, Lee Goldberg, Naomi Hirahara, T. Jefferson Parker, Diana Gould, Joshua Corin, and Alexandra Sokoloff

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 18.01.2021
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Quicklet on 60 Minutes Entertainment Profiles: ...
3,00 CHF *
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ABOUT THE BOOK DISCLAIMER: This contains explicit language that may not be suitable for readers of all ages. It's hard to believe that South Park has been on the air for 15 years. The show features four trash-talking ten-year-olds - Stan, Kyle, Cartman, and Kenny - who somehow find themselves in the midst of every political, religious, and cultural crisis facing America. It is fearless and crude, and it created an instant uproar when it first debuted on Comedy Central. The animation is deliberately and laughably bad, and most of the voices are provided by its two creators, Trey Parker and Matt Stone. But it was the freshest thing that anyone had seen on TV in years. And it's still fresh to this day. Parker and Stone recently sat down for an interview with 60 Minutes correspondent Steve Kroft. When I watched the segment, I was amazed to see that this dynamic comedy duo have lost none of their edge. As the segment pointed out, they're in their 40s now, but they still want to tackle the most pressing and controversial issues that other media personalities are afraid to touch. Not necessarily to be inflammatory, but rather to push the envelope of comedy. In Stone's own words, 'We want to do jokes other people haven't done, you know.' And they've recently taken their unique comedy sensibilities to Broadway, where they have created the subversive musical The Book of Mormon. The show is a smash hit and the winner of nine Tony awards, including the award for Best Musical. MEET THE AUTHOR Ben Sztajnkrycer was born in Montreal, Canada and moved to Los Angeles to pursue filmmaking. He is a graduate of UCLA's prestigious screenwriting program, where he won numerous awards for his work. He teaches screenwriting at Cal State Fullerton. In his free time, Ben loves watching 'Polar Express' and 'Thomas the Tank Engine' over and over and over and over with his four-year-old son. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK Steve Kroft led Parker and Stone down memory lane, where the two revealed that they attended film school together at the University of Colorado. They each possessed an edgy sense of humor - which could be grating to their fellow students. As Parker recounted, 'Our senses of humor were just so similar that we would just really crack each other up and it got...annoying for everyone else in film school.' But these two clowns took their work very seriously. While still in school, they raised enough money to make the feature film Cannibal! The Musical! This bizarre low-budget musical comedy lived up to its title, recounting the story of a prospector who turned to cannibalism to survive winter in the mountains. The film was rejected from the influential Sundance Film Festival, but it went on to a limited release anyway. From there, Parker and Stone moved to Hollywood, where a studio executive commissioned them to make a short Christmas video for a paltry $1,200. Using crude, cardboard cut-out animation, they put together The Spirit of Christmas, a hilarious skewering of the commercialization of Christmas that pit Jesus against Santa Claus. Buy a copy to keep reading!

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 18.01.2021
Zum Angebot
Hollywood vs. The Author
17,99 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

It’s no secret that authors have a love-hate relationship with Hollywood. The oft-repeated cliché that “the book was better than the movie” holds true for more reasons than the average reader will ever know. When asked about selling their book rights to Hollywood authors like to joke that they drive their manuscripts to the border of Arizona and California and toss them over the fence, driving back the way they came at breakneck speed. This is probably because Hollywood just doesn’t “get it.” Its vision for the film or TV series rarely seems to match the vision of the author. And for those rare individuals who’ve had the fortune of sitting across the desk from one of the myriad, interchangeable development execs praising the brilliance of their work while ticking off a never-ending list of notes for the rewrite, the pros of pitching their work to Hollywood rarely outweigh the cons. Stephen Jay Schwartz has sat on both sides of that desk—first as the Director of Development for film director Wolfgang Petersen, then as a screenwriter and author pitching his work to the film and television industry. He’s seen all sides of what is known in this small community as “Development Hell.” The process is both amusing and heartbreaking. Most authors whose work contains a modicum of commercial potential eventually find themselves in “the room” taking a shot at seeing their creations re-visualized by agents, producers or development executives. What they often discover is that their audience is younger and less worldly as themselves. What passes for “story notes” is often a mishmash of vaguely connected ideas intended to put the producer’s personal stamp on the project. Hollywood Versus The Author is a collection of non-fiction anecdotes by authors who’ve had the pleasure of experiencing the development room firsthand—some who have successfully managed to straddle the two worlds, seeing their works morph into the kinds of feature films and TV shows that make them proud, and others who stepped blindsided into that room after selling their first or second novels. All the stories in this collection illustrate the great divide between the world of literature and the big or small screen. They underscore the insanity of every crazy thing you’ve ever heard about Hollywood. For insiders and outsiders alike, Hollywood Versus The Author delivers the goods. With contributions by Michael Connelly, Lawrence Block, Max Allan Collins, Alan Jacobson, Andrew Kaplan, Tess Gerritsen, James Brown, Peter James, Rob Roberge, Lee Goldberg, Naomi Hirahara, T. Jefferson Parker, Diana Gould, Joshua Corin, and Alexandra Sokoloff

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 18.01.2021
Zum Angebot
Quicklet on 60 Minutes Entertainment Profiles: ...
2,33 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

ABOUT THE BOOK DISCLAIMER: This contains explicit language that may not be suitable for readers of all ages. It's hard to believe that South Park has been on the air for 15 years. The show features four trash-talking ten-year-olds - Stan, Kyle, Cartman, and Kenny - who somehow find themselves in the midst of every political, religious, and cultural crisis facing America. It is fearless and crude, and it created an instant uproar when it first debuted on Comedy Central. The animation is deliberately and laughably bad, and most of the voices are provided by its two creators, Trey Parker and Matt Stone. But it was the freshest thing that anyone had seen on TV in years. And it's still fresh to this day. Parker and Stone recently sat down for an interview with 60 Minutes correspondent Steve Kroft. When I watched the segment, I was amazed to see that this dynamic comedy duo have lost none of their edge. As the segment pointed out, they're in their 40s now, but they still want to tackle the most pressing and controversial issues that other media personalities are afraid to touch. Not necessarily to be inflammatory, but rather to push the envelope of comedy. In Stone's own words, 'We want to do jokes other people haven't done, you know.' And they've recently taken their unique comedy sensibilities to Broadway, where they have created the subversive musical The Book of Mormon. The show is a smash hit and the winner of nine Tony awards, including the award for Best Musical. MEET THE AUTHOR Ben Sztajnkrycer was born in Montreal, Canada and moved to Los Angeles to pursue filmmaking. He is a graduate of UCLA's prestigious screenwriting program, where he won numerous awards for his work. He teaches screenwriting at Cal State Fullerton. In his free time, Ben loves watching 'Polar Express' and 'Thomas the Tank Engine' over and over and over and over with his four-year-old son. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK Steve Kroft led Parker and Stone down memory lane, where the two revealed that they attended film school together at the University of Colorado. They each possessed an edgy sense of humor - which could be grating to their fellow students. As Parker recounted, 'Our senses of humor were just so similar that we would just really crack each other up and it got...annoying for everyone else in film school.' But these two clowns took their work very seriously. While still in school, they raised enough money to make the feature film Cannibal! The Musical! This bizarre low-budget musical comedy lived up to its title, recounting the story of a prospector who turned to cannibalism to survive winter in the mountains. The film was rejected from the influential Sundance Film Festival, but it went on to a limited release anyway. From there, Parker and Stone moved to Hollywood, where a studio executive commissioned them to make a short Christmas video for a paltry $1,200. Using crude, cardboard cut-out animation, they put together The Spirit of Christmas, a hilarious skewering of the commercialization of Christmas that pit Jesus against Santa Claus. Buy a copy to keep reading!

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 18.01.2021
Zum Angebot